Sunday, September 18, 2016

C Day!

Friday Sept 16, 2016... C DAY!
 Yep Friday was my Chemo day. I could not sleep all night knowing it was coming. My mind just kept turning all night long.
I wish I could tell you that I took it like a champ. Big and Brave.. but I can't.. I can tell you that I did it.. and am still here alive and kicking.
I got up , and got dressed.. but what does one wear to chemotherapy? Well wonderwoman of course. Yes when there I had to wear those all to lovely hospital gowns, But it helped knowing she was there, giving me strength... cuz lord I needed it.

As I was driving and praying, the sky was truly gorgeous.
 As I pulled up to the doctors I just sat in my car and wondered if I could just run away. Instead I took some very deep breaths, pulled up my big girl panties... and walked one foot in front of the other into the building.
 I checked in, filled out my paperwork.. and waited.
I was called in and we went over all the procedures and the side effects and how to deal with everything. My doctor patted me on the hand and told me it was all gonna be okay.... but is it really?
So into the room I went and changed into the "gown".
Yes folks this is what fear looks like. the feeling of not knowing what is coming next, and wondering just how much you can actually take, without having a complete breakdown.
Anywhooo. I am extremely dehydrated and not getting the amount of nutrients my body is needing so after putting in my Iv I had to be on saline and nutrients for they said about an hour but it was more like an hour and a half. Then they came and gave me some zofran for anti nausea, and Clonazepam for anti anxiety.
Because my kidney and heart is so bad we decided to get introlesional chemo injection of vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosfamide. That means that they poked me with some needles to numb the area and then stuck a long needle down into my tumor to give me the shot using an unltrasound.
sounds fun huh?
NOPE. I HATE NEEDLES! The iv had me blubbering, you have no idea when they stuck that needle "with your gonna feel a little pressure" down into my uterus. The procedure took about 15 minutes.
But then I had to wait for a little over an hour to make sure I was okay to leave.

I told my friend at work the outher day that I would rather take the chemo pill everyday than the hormone therapy... I was wrong ...ohh so wrong. of course this was not a low dose and was given all at once.
I cannot even begin to describe the feeling. Your dignity and humility goes right out the window.
I was throwing up, I had diarrhea. I ached all over, I was burning up and had chills. My head was killing me... I could not even think.
I literally just layed on a towel in my bathroom floor for most of the day.
Most people like me didnt know that when you get chemo you are "contagious" for 48 hours. it leaves your body through sweat, vomit, bodily fluids. So I had to wear a facemask. flush the toilet twice every time it was used, spray lysol and use hand sanitizer.
I am at this point so very grateful that no one decided to be a good samaritan and come sit with me. I would have been mortified and I would have worried that I would get them sick.
I wasn't even sure if it was worth all of it about 4 hours in. I was completely done. done with life, done with being sick.. done with cancer. why couldnt I just be normal. why did this have to happen.. not only once but 4 times?
Hey you have a lot of time to think as your laying on a bathroom floor alternating between getting sick out of both ends...
Cancer is not pretty... and it is definitely not for the weak. I do not think of myself as strong sometimes. but I ask how many people would feel strong going through this. It used to make me feel bad because I know there are others that have had it worse and even not conquered it.. but in  few moments I've decided its okay to just be weak.
As far as selfies go these suck.. but I wanted to show that its not always pretty people dont always smile. I had to change out of my wonder woman shirt when I got home cause I had thrown up on it a couple times... into the wash it went for 2 washes. and I changed into my peach jammies I bought just for this occasion. I have breast cancer shirts and sweats but it infuriates me that breast cancer is so easily accessible but outher cancers are not.

Around 5 hours in god must have took pity on me cause the throwing up and cramping calmed down.
I layed on the couch and clicking through the channels I found watched big hero 6.. my level of pain is around a ... 9  okay by that time maybe not a 9 but it felt like I was dieing.
 I ate some soup around 9 but it had no taste. I watched tv and tried to sleep. my body ached so bad. I tossed and turned. my head hurt.
I got up and decided today is a new day Im just gonna get over this... nope. today I had this overwelming since of sadness, hopelessness. I just can't describe it and I cant fix it. I pretty much laid around all day. my body is just exhausted. I took 2 hot baths, they helped a little.
Todays sunday and my body doesn't hurt as bad but the ache is still there. I havent puked since yesterday morning. and even the diarhea isnt always there so thats a plus. I still feel down. But Im hoping it will go away. or I will just work around it.
I think the hardest part is not knowing. Not knowing if it helped or what will happen... and not knowing if I'll have to go through it again.
Today all you can see is a little mark from the needle. Just one tiny little mark that caused so much pain and devastation. yes the picture has a filter on it. didn't want to scare you with the stretchmarks.

I think Im going to take a bath and maybe actually get dressed today and try to do something outher than lay on the couch... and not feel like a bum. I want to thank everyone that has been praying for me and given me well wishes of hopes and prayers.

Hope is what guides us. It's what gets us through the day... and especially the night.



Saturday, September 17, 2016

Everyday v8 template set, a new release from Triple J Designs





This week, Triple J Designs has a new template pack for you all to play with. With spaces for two or three photos, the possibilities are endless!

On sale 30% off through September 22nd..
Everyday Templates v8

A little CT inspiration...



Kim B


Jamie









HAPPY SCRAPPIN YA'ALL!

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Uterine Sarcomas

What is Uterine Sarcomas?
Cancer starts when cells in the body begin to grow out of control. Cells in nearly any part of the body can become cancer, and can spread to other areas of the body. To learn more about how cancers start and spread, see What Is Cancer?
Uterine sarcoma is a cancer of the muscle and supporting tissues of the uterus (womb).

About the uterus

The uterus is a hollow organ, about the size and shape of a medium-sized pear. It has two main parts:
  • The lower end of the uterus, which extends into the vagina, is called the cervix.
  • The upper part of the uterus is called the body, and is also known as the corpus.
The body of the uterus has 3 layers. The inner layer or lining is called the endometrium. The serosa is the layer of tissue coating the outside of the uterus. In the middle is a thick layer of muscle that is also known as the myometrium. This muscle layer is needed to push a baby out during childbirth.

Cancers of the uterus and endometrium

Sarcomas are cancers that start from tissues such as muscle, fat, bone, and fibrous tissue (the material that forms tendons and ligaments). Cancers that start in epithelial cells, the cells that line or cover most organs, are called carcinomas.
More than 95% of cancers of the uterus are carcinomas. If a carcinoma starts in the cervix, it is called a cervical carcinoma. Carcinomas starting in the endometrium, the lining of the uterus, are called endometrial carcinomas. These cancers are discussed in our other documents Cervical Cancer and Endometrial (Uterine) Cancer. This document is only about uterine sarcomas.
Most uterine sarcomas are put into categories, based on the type of cell they developed from:
  • Endometrial stromal sarcomas develop in the supporting connective tissue (stroma) of the endometrium. These cancers are rare, representing less than 1% (1 in 100) of all uterine cancers. These tumors are low grade -- the cancer cells do not look very abnormal and they tend to grow slowly. Patients with these tumors have a better outlook than those with other uterine sarcomas .
  • Undifferentiated sarcomas used to be considered a type of endometrial stromal sarcoma, but since they are more aggressive and are treated differently from low-grade tumors, they are now considered separately. These cancers make up less than 1% of all uterine cancers and tend to have a poor outlook.
  • Uterine leiomyosarcomas start in the muscular wall of the uterus known as the myometrium. These tumors make up about 2% of cancers that start in the uterus.
Another type of cancer that starts in the uterus is called carcinosarcoma. These cancers start in the endometrium and have features of both sarcomas and carcinomas. They can be classified with uterine sarcomas, but many doctors now believe they are more closely related to carcinomas. These cancers are also known as malignant mixed mesodermal tumors or malignant mixed mullerian tumors. Uterine carcinosarcomas are discussed in detail in our document Endometrial (Uterine) Cancer.

Benign uterine tumors

Several types of benign (non-cancerous) tumors can also develop in the connective tissues of the uterus. These tumors, such as leiomyomas, adenofibromas, and adenomyomas, are also known as types of fibroid tumors. Most of the time, these tumors require no treatment. Treatment may be needed, however, if they start causing problems--- such as pelvic pain, heavy bleeding, frequent urination, or constipation. In some cases, the tumor is removed, leaving the rest of the uterus in place. This surgery is called a myomectomy. Some treatments destroy these benign tumors without surgery, by blocking the blood vessels that feed them, by killing the tumor cells with electric current, or by freezing them with liquid nitrogen. Another option is to remove the entire uterus. This surgery is called a hysterectomy

What are the key statistics about uterine sarcoma?

The American Cancer Society's estimates for cancer of the uterine corpus (body of the uterus) in the United States for 2016 are:
  • About 60,050 new cases of cancer of the uterine corpus will be diagnosed, but only about 1,600 of these cases will be uterine sarcomas.
  • About 10,470 women in the United States will die from cancer of the uterine corpus.
 
 symptoms:

In most cases, the possibility of uterine sarcoma is suggested by certain symptoms. These symptoms do not always mean that a woman has a uterine sarcoma. In fact, they are more often caused by something else, such as non-cancerous changes in the uterus, pre-cancerous overgrowth of the endometrium, or endometrial carcinoma. Still, if you are having these problems, you should see a doctor to see find the cause and get any needed treatment.

Abnormal bleeding or spotting

If you have gone through menopause, any vaginal bleeding or spotting is abnormal, and it should be reported to your health care professional right away. About 85% of patients diagnosed with uterine sarcomas have irregular vaginal bleeding (between periods) or bleeding after menopause. This symptom is more often caused by something other than cancer, but it is important to have a medical evaluation of any irregular bleeding right away. Of the uterine sarcomas, leiomyosarcomas are less likely to cause abnormal bleeding than endometrial stromal sarcomas and undifferentiated sarcomas.

Vaginal discharge

About 10% of women with uterine sarcomas have a vaginal discharge that does not have any visible blood. A discharge is most often a sign of infection or another benign condition, but it also can be a sign of cancer. Any abnormal discharge should be investigated by your health care professional.

Pelvic pain and/or a mass

When they are first diagnosed, about 10% of women with uterine sarcomas have pelvic pain and/or a mass (tumor) that can be felt. You or your doctor may be able to feel the mass in your uterus, or you might have a feeling of fullness in your pelvis.

Staging is the process of analyzing information about a tumor to find out how far the cancer has spread. The stage of a uterine sarcoma is an important factor in choosing treatment. Ask your health care team to explain your cancer's stage so that you can make fully informed choices about your treatment.
The systems used for staging uterine sarcoma, the FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) system and the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system, are the same.
Staging is based on: the size or extent of the tumor (T), whether the cancer has spread to lymph nodes (N) and whether it has spread to distant sites (M). Uterine sarcoma is staged based on examination of tissue removed during an operation. This is known as surgical staging and means that doctors can't tell for sure what stage the cancer is in until after surgery is done (in most cases). The staging system classifies the cancer in stages I through IV, with each of these stages being further divided by letters (for example, stages IIA and IIB).
The staging system looks at how far the cancer has spread:
  • It can spread locally to other parts of the uterus and to tissues of the pelvis, including the fallopian tubes, ovaries, and tissue near the uterus.
  • It can also spread regionally to nearby lymph nodes (bean-sized organs that are part of the immune system) and other parts of the pelvis. The regional lymph nodes are found in the pelvis and farther away along the aorta (the main artery that runs from the heart down along the back of the abdomen and pelvis). The lymph nodes along the aorta are called the para-aortic nodes.
  • Finally, the cancer can spread to distant lymph nodes or organs such as the lungs, liver, bone, brain, and others.

Stages:

Tumor extent (T)

T0: No signs of a tumor in the uterus can be found.
T1: The tumor is growing in the uterus, but has not started growing outside the uterus.
  • T1a: The tumor is only in the uterus and is no larger than 5 cm across (5 cm is about 2 inches).
  • T1b: The tumor is only in the uterus and is larger than 5 cm across.
T2: The tumor is growing outside the uterus but is not growing outside of the pelvis.
  • T2a: The tumor is growing into the adnexa (the ovaries and fallopian tubes).
  • T2b: The tumor is growing into tissues of the pelvis other than the adnexa.
T3: The tumor is growing into tissues of the abdomen.
  • T3a: The tumor is growing into tissues of the abdomen in one place only.
  • T3b: The tumor is growing into tissues of the abdomen in 2 or more places.
T4: The tumor is growing into the bladder or rectum.

Lymph node spread (N)

NX: Spread to nearby lymph nodes cannot be assessed.
N0: The cancer has not spread to nearby lymph nodes.
N1: Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes.

Distant spread (M)

M0: The cancer has not spread to distant lymph nodes, organs, or tissues.
M1: The cancer has spread to distant organs (such as the lungs or liver).

Stage grouping

Information about the tumor, lymph nodes, and any cancer spread is combined to assign the stage of disease. This process is called stage grouping. The stages are described using Roman numerals from I to IV. Some stages are divided into sub-stages indicated by letters.
Stage I (T1, N0, M0): The cancer is only in the uterus (T1). It has not spread to lymph nodes (N0) or distant sites (M0).
  • Stage IA (T1a, N0, M0): The cancer is only in the uterus and is no larger than 5 cm across (T1a). It has not spread to nearby lymph nodes (N0) or distant sites (M0).
  • Stage IB (T1b, N0, M0): The cancer is only in the uterus and is larger than 5 cm across (T1b). It has not spread to nearby lymph nodes (N0) or distant sites (M0).
Stage II (T2, N0, M0): The cancer is growing outside the uterus but is not growing outside of the pelvis (T2). The cancer has not spread to nearby lymph nodes (N0) or distant sites (M0).
  • Stage IIA (T2a, N0, M0): The cancer is growing into the adnexa (the ovaries and fallopian tubes) (T2a). It has not spread to nearby lymph nodes (N0) or distant sites (M0).
  • Stage IIB (T2b, N0, M0): The cancer is growing into tissues of the pelvis other than the adnexa (T2b). It has not spread to nearby lymph nodes (N0) or distant sites (M0).
Stage III: Any of the following:
  • Stage IIIA (T3a, N0, M0): The cancer is growing into tissues of the abdomen in one place only (T3a). It has not spread to nearby lymph nodes (N0) or distant sites (M0).
  • Stage IIIB (T3b, N0, M0): The cancer is growing into tissues of the abdomen in 2 or more places (T3b). It has not spread to lymph nodes (N0) or distant sites (M0).
  • Stage IIIC (T1 to T3, N1, M0): The cancer in the uterus can be any size and may have grown into tissues in the pelvis and/or abdomen. It has not spread to the bladder or rectum (T1 to T3). The cancer has spread to lymph nodes near the uterus (pelvic and/or para-aortic lymph nodes) (N1). It has not spread to distant sites (M0).
Stage IV: The cancer has spread to the urinary bladder or the rectum (lower part of the large intestine), and/or to distant organs, such as the bones or lungs.
  • Stage IVA (T4, any N, M0): The cancer has spread to the rectum or urinary bladder (T4). It may also be in the lymph nodes (any N) but has not spread to distant sites (M0).
  • Stage IVB (any T, any N, M1): The cancer in the uterus can be any size and may or may not have grown into tissues in the pelvis and/or abdomen (including the bladder or rectum) (any T). The cancer may or may not have spread to lymph nodes near the uterus (any N). The cancer has spread to organs that are not next to the uterus, such as the bones or lungs, or it has spread to distant lymph nodes, such as those in the groin area (M1). 

Treatment options for uterine sarcoma, by stage

Surgery to remove the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries and sample the lymph nodes is the main treatment for uterine sarcomas. Sometimes this is followed by treatment with radiation, chemotherapy (chemo), or hormone therapy. Treatments given after the cancer has been completely removed with surgery are called adjuvant treatments. Adjuvant therapy is given to help keep the cancer from coming back. This approach has helped patients with certain cancers like colon and breast cancer live longer. So far, though, adjuvant treatments for uterine sarcoma have not helped patients live longer. Since uterine sarcoma is rare, it has been hard to study it well.
Women who can't have surgery because they have other health problems are treated with radiation, chemo, or hormone therapy. Often some combination of these other treatments is used.

Leiomyosarcoma and undifferentiated sarcoma

Stages I and II: Most women have surgery to remove the uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries (hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy). Pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection or laparoscopic lymph node sampling may also be done. During surgery, organs near the uterus and the thin membrane that lines the pelvic and abdominal cavities (peritoneum) are carefully examined to determine if the cancer has spread beyond the uterus.
In young women with low-grade leiomyosarcomas (LMS) that have not spread beyond the uterus, the surgeon may—rarely--be able to leave the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries in place, and instead remove only the tumor along with a rim of the normal tissue around it. This approach is not standard treatment, so it is not often offered. It may rarely be a choice for some women who want to still be able to have children after their cancer has been treated. This option has risks, however, so women considering this surgery need to discuss the possible risks and benefits with their gynecologic oncologist before making a decision. It may also be possible to leave a young woman’s ovaries in place (but remove the uterus and fallopian tubes), since it isn’t clear that this will lead to worse outcomes. Still, this is not a standard treatment, and you should discuss the possible risks and benefits with your doctor. In either case, close follow-up is important, and additional surgery may be needed if the cancer comes back.
After surgery, treatment with radiation (or sometimes chemo) may be recommended. This is called adjuvant treatment and may lower the chance that the cancer will come back in the pelvis. The goal of surgery is to remove all of the cancer, but the surgeon can only remove what can be seen. Tiny clumps of cancer cells that are too small to be seen can be left behind. Treatments given after surgery are meant to kill those cancer cells so that they don't get the chance to grow into larger tumors.
For LMS of the uterus, adjuvant radiation may lower the chance of the cancer growing back in the pelvis (called local recurrence), but it doesn't seem to help women live longer.
Since the cancer can still come back in the lungs or other distant organs, some experts recommend giving chemo after surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy) for stage II cancers. Chemo is sometimes recommended for stage I LMS as well, but it is less clear that it is really helpful. So far, results from studies of adjuvant chemotherapy have been promising in early stage LMS, but long-term follow-up is still needed to see if this treatment really helps women live longer. Studies of adjuvant therapy are still in progress. For anyone being treated for uterine LMS, entering a clinical trial is always a good option.
Stage III: Surgery is done to remove all of the cancer. This includes removing the uterus (a hysterectomy), removing both fallopian tubes and ovaries (bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy), and lymph node dissection or sampling. If the tumor has spread to the vagina (stage IIIB), part (or even all) of the vagina will need to be removed as well.
After surgery, treatment with radiation (with or without chemo) may be offered to lower the chance that the cancer will come back.
Patients who are too sick (from other medical conditions) to have surgery may be treated with radiation and/or chemo.
Stage IV is divided into stage IVA and stage IVb.
Stage IVA cancers have spread to nearby organs and tissues, such as the bladder or rectum. These cancers may be able to be completely removed with surgery, and this is usually done if possible. If the cancer cannot be removed completely, radiation may be given, either alone or with chemo.
Stage IVB cancers have spread outside of the pelvis, most often to the lungs, liver, or bone. There is currently no standard treatment for these cancers. Chemo may be able to shrink the tumors for a time, but is not thought to be able to cure the cancer. Radiation therapy may also be an option.
Women with stage IV uterine sarcomas might consider taking part in clinical trials (scientific studies of promising treatments) testing new chemo or other treatments.

Endometrial stromal sarcoma

Stages I and II: Early stage endometrial stromal sarcoma is treated with surgery: hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (removal of the uterus, both fallopian tubes and both ovaries). Some young women may be given the option of keeping their ovaries, but this is not the standard treatment. Pelvic lymph nodes may be removed as well. After surgery, some women do not get further treatment. These women are watched closely for signs that the cancer has returned. Others may be treated with hormone therapy and sometimes radiation to the pelvis. These can lower the chances of the cancer coming back, but they have not been shown to help patients live longer.
Patients who are too sick (from other medical conditions) to have surgery may be treated with radiation and/or hormone therapy.
Stage III: Surgery is done to remove all of the cancer. This includes removing the uterus (a hysterectomy), removing both fallopian tubes and ovaries (bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy), and lymph node dissection or sampling. If the tumor has spread to the vagina (stage IIIB), part (or even all) of the vagina will need to be removed as well. Treatment after surgery depends on the type of sarcoma.
Women with endometrial stromal sarcomas might receive radiation, hormone therapy, or both after surgery.
Patients who are too sick (from other medical conditions) to have surgery may be treated with radiation, chemo, and/or hormone therapy.
Stage IV is divided into stage IVA and stage IVb.
Stage IVA cancers have spread to nearby organs and tissues, such as the bladder or rectum. These cancers may be able to be completely removed with surgery, and this is is usually done if possible. If the cancer cannot be removed completely, radiation may be given, either alone or with chemo. Hormone therapy is also an option.
Stage IVB cancers have spread outside of the pelvis, most often to the lungs, liver, or bone. Hormone therapy can help for a time. Chemo and radiation are also options.
Women with stage IV uterine sarcomas might consider taking part in clinical trials (scientific studies of promising treatments) testing new chemo or other treatments.

Recurrent uterine sarcoma

If a cancer comes back after treatment, it is called recurrent. If the cancer comes back in the same area as it was in the first place, it is called a local recurrence. For uterine sarcoma, the cancer growing back as a tumor in the pelvis would be a local recurrence. If it comes back in another area like the liver or lungs, it is called a distant recurrence.
Unfortunately, uterine sarcoma often comes back in the first few years after treatment. Treatment options are the same as those for stage IV. If the cancer can be removed, surgery may be done. Radiation may be used to reduce the size of the tumor and relieve the symptoms of large pelvic tumors. Sarcoma often comes back as spread to the lungs. If there are only 1 or 2 small tumors, these may be able to be removed with surgery. Some patients have been cured by this treatment.

What will happen after treatment for uterine sarcoma?

For some people with cancer, treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about cancer coming back. (When cancer comes back after treatment, it is called recurrence.) This is a very common concern in people who have had cancer.
It may take a while before your fears lessen. But it may help to know that many cancer survivors have learned to live with this uncertainty and are living full lives. Our document Living With Uncertainty: The Fear of Cancer Recurrence gives more detailed information on this.
For other people, the cancer may never go away completely. These people may get regular treatments with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or other therapies to try to help keep the cancer in check. Learning to live with cancer that does not go away can be difficult and very stressful. It has its own type of uncertainty. Our document When Cancer Doesn’t Go Away talks more about this.

Follow-up care

When treatment ends, your doctors will still want to watch you closely. It is very important to go to all of your follow-up appointments. During these visits, your doctors will ask questions about any problems you may have and may do exams and lab tests or x-rays and scans to look for signs of cancer or treatment side effects. Almost any cancer treatment can have side effects. Some may last for a few weeks to months, but others can last the rest of your life. This is the time for you to talk to your cancer care team about any changes or problems you notice and any questions or concerns you have.
It is important to keep health insurance. Tests and doctor visits cost a lot, and even though no one wants to think of their cancer coming back, this could happen.
Should your cancer come back, our document When Your Cancer Comes Back: Cancer Recurrence can give you information on how to manage and cope with this phase of your treatment.

Seeing a new doctor

At some point after your cancer diagnosis and treatment, you may find yourself seeing a new doctor who does not know anything about your medical history. It is important that you be able to give your new doctor the details of your diagnosis and treatment. Gathering these details soon after treatment may be easier than trying to get them at some point in the future. Make sure you have this information handy:
  • A copy of your pathology report(s) from any biopsies or surgeries
  • If you had surgery, a copy of your operative report
  • If you had radiation, a copy of your treatment summary
  • If you were hospitalized, a copy of the discharge summary that doctors prepare when patients are sent home from the hospital
  • If you had chemotherapy (including hormone therapy), a list of the drugs, drug doses, and when you took them
  • Copies of any imaging tests (such as CTs or MRIs) – these can often be put on a CD or DVD
  • How does having a uterine sarcoma affect your emotional health?

    When treatment ends, you may find yourself overcome with many different emotions. This happens to a lot of people. You may have been going through so much during treatment that you could only focus on getting through each day. Now it may feel like a lot of other issues are catching up with you.
    You may find yourself thinking about death and dying. Or maybe you're more aware of the effect the cancer has on your family, friends, and career. You may take a new look at your relationship with those around you. Unexpected issues may also cause concern. For instance, as you feel better and have fewer doctor visits, you will see your health care team less often and have more time on your hands. These changes can make some people anxious.
    Almost everyone who has been through cancer can benefit from getting some type of support. You need people you can turn to for strength and comfort. Support can come in many forms: family, friends, cancer support groups, church or spiritual groups, online support communities, or one-on-one counselors. What's best for you depends on your situation and personality. Some people feel safe in peer-support groups or education groups. Others would rather talk in an informal setting, such as church. Others may feel more at ease talking one-on-one with a trusted friend or counselor. Whatever your source of strength or comfort, make sure you have a place to go with your concerns.
    The cancer journey can feel very lonely. It is not necessary or good for you to try to deal with everything on your own. And your friends and family may feel shut out if you do not include them. Let them in, and let in anyone else who you feel may help. If you aren’t sure who can help, call your American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345 and we can put you in touch with a group or resource that may work for you.
     
 Now imagine sitting in a room and getting this information... it's a little daunting to say the least

Hope is what guides me it's what gets me through the day and especially the night...
 

Monday, September 12, 2016

September is uterine cancer awareness month

September is Uterine Cancer Awareness month
Bet you didn't know that. Yeah I didn't either. Sometimes I get so mad because the only cancer people really hear about is breast and children. While I agree those are horrific,  they are not the only ones.
Today has just been a horrible day. the kind of day where you are either freezing or burning up and can't be in between. 
Where the hot baths , the muscle rub, the heating pads, and the asprin help none whatsoever.
The kid of day you just cry and then feel bad about crying, but can't help it so you do it anyways.
Where your lips are so dry there sore from dehydration but not even chapstick soothes them.
Your soo tired from anemia but when you lay down to try to sleep your thoughts keep you awake & the pain in your muscles just ache so bad.
Sometimes life just sucks. It throws you all kinds of curve balls and doesnt bother to give you a play book.
Tomorrow will be better...
 
Hope is what guides you, it's what gets you through the day & especially the night...

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Double Sneak Peak with 3 chance to win from Christaly Designs

Coming Soon!!!!
Are you ready for a new chance to win????
Here's a DOUBLE Sneak Peek :D
It's time for another Sneak Peek!!  These templates packs are releasing on September 15th!!

Leave a comment HERE for a  chance to win these templates packs on the day of release!!  Please include your email!  (Email format for privacy:  alysson96(at)hotmail(dot)com )

If you would like a SECOND opportunity, post this to your Pinterest album. Come back HERE and leave another comment with the URL to your post.  Don't forget your email.

If you would like a THIRD opportunity, post this to your Facebook Timeline.  Come back HERE and leave another comment with the URL to your post. Don't forget you email.  This could be your timeline,  a page, or a group.  Where ever you think it fits best.

Good luck, ladies!
 
Happy Scrappin Ya'all!
 

Growing pains Scrapped September Featured kit... Hit the books

It's time for the September Featured Kit challenge here at Growing Pains Scrapped. To play along this month, you will need to scrap a page using the parts of "Hit the Books" by Growing Pains Scrapped. You page must use only papers and elements from Growing Pains Scrapped, but you are welcome to use templates by other designers. You must use "Hit the Books" as part of your page design this month. Head over to the Growing Pains Scrapped Fan Group for all the contest details and to submit your page. You can pick up all the pieces to "Hit the Books" on sale for 40% off the rest of September. Buy the BUNDLE for the best deal, or pick up the individual packs you like! b2d7e54f24d53c114ab5d5a4d4aaaed4-image-385x3381 gps_hitthebooks_essentials-element-preview gps_hitthebooks_school-days-element-preview gps_hitthebooks_science-class-element-preview��gps_hitthebooks_paint-preview gps_hitthebooks_glitter-preview gps_hitthebooks_paper-preview gps_hitthebooks_qp-preview

Here are some amazing pages made by the Growing Pains Scrapped team using "Hit the Books"

Here are some awesome freebies using "Hit the Books" from the Creative Team: First up, you can download my freebie on by clicking on my preview:  
Next up are two freebies created by CT Members Tina and Amy that are only available to members of the Growing Pains Scrapped Fan Group gps_hitbooks_scienceclusterfreebie And how about one final freebie available right here on the Growing Pains Scrapped blog. Click the image below or the words download to download the freebie. gps_hitbooks_schoolclusterfreebie Download here

Happy Scrappin Ya'All!
 

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

It hit me like lightning...

There are days that I am so done with all of this. I want to scream and cry and throw a fit and just want to know why.
Why me?
This part of the song really gets to me . 
"It hit me like lighting late one night
I was all out of hope and all out of fight.
Couldn't fight back the tears so I fell on my knees
saying god if your there come and rescue me" 

I have hope because without it I have nothing. And I know that god must have a plan. I just wish he would share that plan with me. I said when I found out again that maybe he was trying to teach me a lesson and I just wasn't getting it. Im trying to figure just what that lesson is so I can rectify it.
On thursday I went home early from work. I felt so bad later learning that a coworker never showed up & left the outher csm all alone. but I just couldn't do it. we had a high up in our store for a visit and it would have been horrifying to throw up in front of him.
I went to the doctor on Friday to find I was extremely dehydrated and my body is not getting the nutrients that it needs from the throwing up.And my kidneys are pissed cause they decided to give me a bad kidney infection. So they put me on a saline and nutrient iv. 
But I went to work and made myself do it.
I honestly think if it wasnt for work I would just sit here and be depressed.
Work gives me something to focus on and gives me purpose. Makes me feel like maybe my life means something. I can go and cry on my friends shoulders, or talk .
I don't want someone to read this and think I am just complaining and bitching. I use this to get out my feelings , so I can rage and get sad and get depressed... then get over it.

So I think Im just going to take this thing day by day .
... I CAN DO THIS!

~ hope is what guides me it it what gets me through the day... and especially the night.